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graduated with honors. >> coming up next. you don't want to miss this report, louisiana where a man is battling the federal government over a frock. you heard me right, a frog that nobody has seen in the state for 50 years, and the government's harassing this man about a frog. a special hannity investigation into big government gone wild next. fighting constipation by eating healthier, drinking plenty of water, but still not getting relief? try dulcolax laxative tablets. dulcolax is comfort-coated for gentle, over-night relief. dulcolax. predictable over-night relief you can count on. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. it guides you to a number it guides you to a number that will change your life: your sleep number setting. it even knows you by name. now it's easier than ever to experience deep, restful sleep with the sleep number bed's dualair tec
. you don't want to miss this report, louisiana where a man is battling the federal government over a frock. you heard me right, a frog that nobody has seen in the state for 50 years, and the government's harassing this man about a frog. a special hannity investigation into big government gone wild next. fighti right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. >>> imagine waking up one day, you find out the government has declared your private property to be a critical habitat for an endangered frog. to make matters worse, the frog has not been seen in your home state for 50 years. this is not a joke. it happened to one man in louisiana, we went down to the bayou state for a special hannity investigation. listen carefully in
.m. in the east. we're going to begin with a tense 12-hour standoff at a bank in louisiana. it is now over, and this morning with the hostage-taker dead and two of the hostages shot. it happened in st. joseph, that's near louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are lis
to see. a sinkhole in action, and it's inching closer and closer to a louisiana town. the state says there's only one way to stop it. find out what that is. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. yeah... try new alka seltzer fruit chews. they work fast on heartburn and taste awesome. these are good. told ya! i'm feeling better already. [ male announcer ] new alka seltzer fruits chews. enjoy the relief! [ male announcer ] new alka seltzer fruits chews. exciting and would always come max and pto my rescue. bookstore but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and
sboog florida and into georgia. as we get through saturday, we see it spread back to louisiana and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they a
on the honeymoon. >> on the honeymoon? >> she's buried near baton rouge, louisiana of diphtheria or -- i don't know, something. she'lls buried there. and then he was all alone on his plantation for a long, long time. he had a wealthy brother who kind of kept him in wealth. then he married varina howell from natchez, mississippi. it's still there. rouge, louisiana of diphtheria howell was, i hate to say pushy, but she was. she was a very aggressive lady. and wherever she went, everybody knew her. and she was the belle of washington. i mean everybody was -- she was in everybody's house and of course the president's too because of the taylors, you know, at first. the taylors. and so anyway then pearce. and so she was close to everyone. leaving washington, if i put it in modern terminology with the papers we have today in reporting, it would have been a sensational thing for this couple leaving on the train to go to south when the civil war began. davis had been very much involved in the remodelling of the capitol, which went on at that time. and not really a fire brand. he wasn't as obsessive as some
not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it something else. civil union, maybe that is what you have to do. maybe that is what we were all word,ng over, a sem
. this is stanford from louisiana, 77 years old. hello. caller: good morning. i'm calling because i was at the first march. i had followed what was going on during that time. that you are speaking of included -- and i want to speak -- included in that spirit and i want to speak of the veterans of the civil rights march. had ato me that the vets to the united states military. they do notl, support president kennedy early on. the vets had come home seeking to participate in the country's they sought civil rights. some were hung in their uniforms. so threats to their homes and communities, the veterans regressed back to their homes and their neighborhoods and their farms and things like that. until they heard of reverend king and his movement. then they came out. never saw the crowds behind the frontline of king, lori, and that group, the group of the leadership in the march. who were those people behind them? vets.f them were most of the more people who had fought in germany and north africa and the philippines and japan, etc. they came home and they do not have civil rights for themselves. so here's
was the executive director of c.o.r.e. well, farmer was in jail in louisiana and refused to come out of jail to participate in the march. and here is martin luther king, jr., a wonderful human being. wer, my met him in 1958 when i was 18 years old. this is eugene carson blake, who was head of the national council of churches. and this young man here is cleveland robinson. this man was almost blind, but no one wanted to say to him, "but you cannot walk with the group." and so he walked with us. this is rabbi joachim prince of the american jewish congress. he was born in berlin and moved to america during the late '30s. he moved to newark, new jersey, and became a leader, a spokesperson for civil liberty, civil rights. and this is joe rauh. he was one of the unbelievable leaders in the naacp. and this is unbelievable whitney young, who was head of the national urban league. >> right. >> who's been a dean at the school of social work at atlanta university. roy wilkins, the head of the naacp. walter reuther, the head of the united automobile workers union. >> and this is a. philip randolph. >> y
of texas, oklahoma even louisiana looking at temperatures into the triple digits. 26 is the high in san antonio. high temperatures only in the 70s. feeling a little september like out there. especially during the early morning hours. >> that's around average, 106. >> talk about a power play. h lottery officials announcing three people will share the massive $448 million jackpot. two winning tickets sold in new jersey one in minnesota. the winning numbers are 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the power ball 32. wpxf reporter is live in little lake harbor, new jersey where one of those winning tickets mr. sold. good morning, stacy. >> good morning. minnesota area. people would have better odds winning buying their tickets in pennsylvania. there have been so many power ball winners. goes to show we were wrong. two winners in new jersey one ticket sold at acme supermarket in little lake harbor. new jersey.com also reporting that a ticket was sold in south brunswick again at a grocery store. we have two winners in new jersey two people who may have been passing through new jersey now going to be mega mi
back to the louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "we hold these truths to be system of self- -- self evident that all men are created equal." i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i
to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed. we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of
not think it has any credibility whatsoever. host: let's go back to your point. from: i just came louisiana. i had a great trip there. there is such potential to open up and create jobs here. host: what is it? guest: it is taking those amazing resources of natural gas and oil and also the renewals -- the renewables there and putting americans to work and creating revenue that we need for better roads and better schools. i think in washington we too often polarize things. either you are for the environment or for jobs or something like this. i do not see it that way. we can do what has and done in louisiana and other areas. diversify the economy. they have great paying jobs. i want the same thing here. host: what specifically? iran on the opening of coastal virginia so that we can journal and get to the natural resources that are there in an environmentally safe way. the governor ran on it. the general assembly want it. the only thing holding us back is the administration. that is not a partisan comments. there is essentially a. . they are not moving forward. .- that is essentially it they a
-old in louisiana shot and killed his 90-year-old caregiver as she watched television. police report the boy had just finished playing the video game grand theft auto. are violent media affecting kids and making them violent. joining us, the doctor from our fine medical aid team. thanks for joining us this morning. that is the question, the piece in the "new york times" this week that said most researchers agree violent media do have an effect on media, do increase the predilection to violence. >> i think focusing on violent media misses the greater problem, which is media. we are deploying, whether through facebook or reality tv lots of ways for people to not be in reality, to not feel their feelings. yes, violent video games are part of that problem, because you can't maintain the connection and have a real reality while being wrenched into virtual reality. it does not work. human beings do not have that capacity, at least some of the outliers among us do not. >> so you're saying that as we're basically anesthetizing our kids with television or video games that aren't able to process how they
report 113-187 in the following order, amendment number one by mr. scalise of louisiana, amendment number three by mr. smith ofs missouri, amendment number four by mr. latham of iowa, amendment number six by mr. nadler of new york, amendment of r eight by mr. johnson georgia, amendment by ms. jackson lee of texas, and amendment by ms. moore of wisconsin. the unfinished request is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number one printed in house report 113-187 offered by mr. scalise of louisiana on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number one printed in house report 113-18 , offered by mr. scalise of louisiana. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any
, went into business with john breaux, a democratic senator. he was a longtime senator from louisiana. as a member of congress, breaux said that his vote -- someone said that -- someone called him a cheap whore and he said, "i'm not that cheap." and he also said, "my vote cannot be bought. it can be rented." anyway, trent lott -- >> so you've got the republican lott and the democratic breaux -- >> demo -- another b -- >> creating a boutique -- >> a bout -- >> lobby firm. >> yeah, although they eventually were absorbed into patton boggs which is, you know, one of the bigger lobbying firms in town -- >> tommy boggs, son of the former speaker, democratic majority leader, hale boggs, who's -- >> exactly. >> one of the most -- well, arguably the most powerful lobbyist firm in washington. >> or it has been for many, many years. but anyway, so trent lott and john breaux have been very, very successful in the last five, six years as lobbyists. trent lott, a pretty candid guy. i mean, he talks about how much he hates washington. i said, "so why do you stay?" and he looked at me like i was craz
, first of all, made possible the louisiana purchase because that poll began was -- thatnapoleon was done with the empire as a result of the humiliating defeat. secondly, after haiti, after that revolution, the north atlantic slave trade was ended by britain and the united. and the last sort of breadth of that was the end of the civil war. one of the great story of history. >> host: this month on booktv in-depth program author and activist randall robinson. he's the author of five non-fiction books. here they are. what is transafrica? >> guest: transafrica is or the organization that i began in 1976 to galvanize african-american opinion on foreign policy issues. particularly issues that concern the black world. u.s. policy africa, the caribbean, and latin america. so transafrica, of course, of the organization that used instrumentality to galvanize american opposition to apartheid . for the set of sanctions that president reagan vetoed was overridden by republican controlled senate because of the work we did and the millions we organized to make a difference. that coupled with the great w
of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in the railroads for a while as a porter. when i met him, he was -- he had a water pump here and a little pecan tree, and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot-five, sleeping on a little iron crate. the crate was too small for him, so he had a wooden beekeeper's box for his head. there were -- i'll looking inside, and there were veinna sausage cans, empty ones, that had had put in the corners to keep the place from falling. literally, chickens have a better roost than had did, and this is where he was living. he came, you know, we found him a half century later, and he was nervous, thought we were government workers here to maybe inspect the house, shut it down, whatever. i said, new york city we're -- i said, no, we're here to tell his story. we're standing in the old lake basin. it was the biggest body of fresh water west of the mississippi, 800 square miles of lake right here in the middle of california, and these cotton grower from the south, chased out by the bull weevil came west, and they
louisiana is cut away. you can't get there anymore. so all their supplies, all the food and all the manpower is coming from the mississippi through the confederacy coming eastbound. it doesn't happen anymore. they can't cross the river. big union controls the river. the other thing is vicksburg is a rail hub. the railroad coming from the east stops at the river in vicksburg and from there it points west -- from points west that stops. now the union army controls the railroad and they cut it off. you can't underestimate the power of rivers and roberts during the civil war. they didn't have interstate highways. they didn't have trucks. these rivers and railroads and the union army by capturing vicksburg stops all of that and the whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wide open for the union army to use and the union navy to use to transport material meant food equipment, so whatever they need and to the south trade it very definitely is the beginning to the end for the confederacy and a lot of people in the confederacy know this. that is the history l
the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- that hasn't now more than doubled in the greater new york city area. guest: geography is geography. part of it is trying to understand better what the risk is. i would say that this is something that people sometimes fail to grasp. just because something was not in a flood zone or was 20 years ago, does not mean that it has not changed in that time frame. is development that occurs, sea level rise, because of a variety of different factors, a place that once had been not in the flood zone, may now be. if you have done other mitigation measures, you can actually move out of the flood zone. there is a community in florida tha
in louisiana at the time. to beduke -- happened teaching in louisiana at the time. david duke nearly became governor of our state. i decided i needed to get politically active to keep the kkk from taking over the state i live in. i became active with the national organization for women because of n.o.w.'s commitment to the intersection of racism, able-ism, homophobia, all of the ism's. they are intertwined. we have been talking to colleagues in the weeks and days leading up to this very luncheon. one of the things we talked of thes the four themes 50th anniversary march on washington. that would be freedom and jobs and peace and social justice. when you look at those issues and ask yourself, what is the impact on women of those things -- then you ask yourself, what is the impact on various communities of women? what is the impact on african- american women? what is the impact on immigrant women? what about latinas, and younger women, and older women? long time ago, a legal scholar she hadrothy roberts -- that phrase. ask the woman question. any issue you are talking about, ask the woman que
from the streets of soma, the fields of georgia, louisiana. is now a united states senator representing the state of maine. he was in the march. seat to good siege -- watch the speech of dr. king. he was in a branch of a tree in the mall watching the speech. people came from all over. these crowd people and these proud african americans and their allies would no longer stand silent why the promise -- while the promise of liberty and justice for all denied freedom to so many. i could not hear the speeches. i felt the heat. i was inside the capital. but i could see the tide of hundreds of as thousands of our brothers and --ters pushed forward tour toward that thing called freedom. day, martin luther king shared his dream. 1963 not as the end of the fight of civil rights, but only the beginning. here is what he said. "we cannot turn back. there are those who are acting -- asking for the civil rights, when will we be satisfied? we are not satisfied and we will not be until justice rolls down like a mighty stream." in the year following the march, those momentum -- momentous words, congress
louisiana. i had a great trip there. there is such potential to open up and create jobs here. host: what is it? guest: it is taking those amazing resources of natural gas and oil and also the renewals -- the renewables there and putting americans to work and creating revenue that we need for better roads and better schools. i think in washington we too often polarize things. either you are for the environment or for jobs or something like this. i do not see it that way. we can do what has and done in louisiana and other areas. diversify the economy. they have great paying jobs. i want the same thing here. host: what specifically? guest: iran on the opening of coastal virginia so that we can journal and get to the natural resources that are there in an environmentally safe way. the governor ran on it. the only thing holding us back is the administration. that is not a partisan comments. there is essentially a. . they are not moving forward. -- that is essentially it. they are not moving forward. we are working hard bipartisan. we want to move that forward and get virginians working again.
. but across the states of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, and texas, maybe not. >> we're going to stop you for not having a gun. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: there you go. exactly. yeah, i guess that's -- you know, that's a state by state issue, chris. >> it is. >> stephanie: killed an unarmed teenager -- all right. okay. daryle in mobile -- >> caller: [ inaudible ] mobile, stephfy. >> stephanie: hi daryle go ahead. >> caller: i was doing 80 and a black guy got ahead of me speeding, and i got pulled over, and i had my police t-shirt on, and i had my weapon on my side. he said okay. i need your license and registration. but he did give me a ticket. >> stephanie: yikes. yeah, interesting. interesting. i guess you are not quite as awesome as george zimmerman. >> caller: i guess not. when i seen that on the news. i said, wow, what a break. >> stephanie: yeah, you are not quite as white looking as george zimmerman. maybe that's what it is. >> wow. >> stephanie: just yet another incredible story, how about incredible that awesome -- >> he's so awesome. >> stephanie: right. he is just g
this and they look over the crowd, everybody here has today affected by the transportation system. in louisiana talking to a manufacturer of our masuda goals, he told me were the most important things was getting those things from the market. he stopped. i can pull this out. i said i'm in the transportation business. we are all in a transportation business. we have to get the serial in the milk out in the morning. she was touched by the system. it will cost more for the milk. .t impacts us all good progress. i think there are some very good reforms. we are still slowly getting the information. secretary fox will be here later today. i am encouraged. we had dinner the other night. i didn't know was several republicans. we had a great conversation. i look forward to it i did. it is always a positive thing. sometimes you have to leave politics at the door and get things done. i'm sure you will appreciate with the signature has to say. they gave us a poor grade. we are at a point where we have got to figure out how to do this anyway that keeps us competitive in the world. there is a federal role. w
have a comment. there was a poll in louisiana as a republican and 29% of them blamed president obama for the government's katrina mess. i think these people that did that are absolutely ignorant. he was just a senator not a president. host: thanks for calling. gale on the line from new jersey. gale is a republican. is the cost of college worth it? caller: well. it was about $15,000 a year 20 years agfor my -- ago for my daughter. she's a nurse and she -- my husband was actually disgusted because he felt she concentrated more on the marching papers. she went to a local community college. also, i'm quite disturbed. i put myself through a business school about 40 years ago. i paid for it out of my $100 a week salary. kids can't afford cost of tuition, why should the taxpayers be paying. you go back to the academic standards of 47 years ago, most of the kids going today are not academically qualified for college. they're getting a free pass because of the social justice. the standards are so bad, i. wouldn't want my kid going to school today. host: thanks for calling gale. so much of
in louisiana. couldn't even come because he was in jail from protest. the tension behind the stage here was over your speech. >> by the forces of our demands, our determination, and our numbers, we should split a segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say wake up, erk many, wake up. for we will not stop and we will not be patient. >> they wanted to change a line in your speech. tell us about that. >> near the end of the speech, near the very end, i said something like if we do not see meaningful progress today they will come we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did non-violently. they said no you can't say that. and the archbishop of the diocese in washington said not to give it if i didn't change it. we met think this side of lincoln. and we had a portable typewriter. and the executive secretary of the non-violent organization, a. phillip randolph was there, dr. king, mr. will kin. and he said to me can we change that? i said john, that doesn't sound like you. and mr. randolph said we've come this
to that ex tents. when louisiana plays the big game, we're choosing my complexion. the second part of the dream was of a bill to make that kind of behavior legal, the civil rights act. then the dream was the right to vote. 18-year-olds would not vote. you couldn't vote on campus. you couldn't vote bilingually. we went to open housing and fair housing. that was another part. last dream really was about the issue of poverty. too much poverty at home and too much war abroad. that remains unfinished business today in a nation so blessed with so few and such abundance, too much poverty. >> he would at this point in time be 84 years of age and if he looked out across the landscape of america and saw 46-plus million people were still languishing in poverty, how would he address that? >> he would challenge the white house and the congress to make it a priority. we have the capacity to wipe out malnutrition. we can make the -- most poor people -- lyndon johnson was ingenious was helping people in appalachia. if you made that into a black community, no, they don't want to work or something,
the streets of california and the las vegas trip, from the streets of soma, the fields of georgia, louisiana. one man is now a united states senator representing the state of maine. he was in the march. he had a good seat to watch the speech of dr. king. he was in a branch of a tree in the mall watching the speech. people came from all over. these crowd people and these proud african americans and their allies would no longer stand silent while the promise of liberty and justice for all denied freedom to so many. i could not hear the speeches. i felt the heat. i was inside the capital. but i could see the tide of history turn as hundreds of thousands of our brothers and sisters pushed forward toward that thing called freedom. that day, martin luther king shared his dream. they consider 1963 not as the end of the fight of civil rights, but only the beginning. here is what he said. "we cannot turn back. there are those who are acting asking for the civil rights, when will we be satisfied? we are not satisfied and we will not be until justice rolls down like a mighty stream." in the year follow
from louisiana to our school in washington because we do not have any. i want to say i have a personal story here. she turned 56 today. on that day in 1963, we all sat down on the floor in our living room and watched a black and white tv. for a child that had turned six have ad that day -- birthday party, she wanted to speech,. king gave his even to the point that my father said, you've got to move your head, because her head was in the way. she was so enthralled. at one time i was suspended from king'sbefore dr. birthday became a holiday. people thealled night before. because theschool schools in seattle were leaving at 12:00. the told me into the office. there was a big ruckus. me fors they suspended gathering people together during school in honor of dr. king. so yes, it has changed. i also want to say that i am appalled at the way the statesnt of these united is treated. to be called a liar in the halls of congress is an abomination. host: thank you for the call from washington. we have this point on our twitter page. king came to washington as part of a demonstration on racial and
went to play a football game in new orleans, louisiana. closer to the mic? i like talking loud. i got my dad's genes for talking loud. can you all hear me? and in 1965 when they went down to new orleans, there was a running back for the buffalo bills named cookie gilchrist. cookie used to drive around the milk truck in the off-season when they had to make money, because football salaries didn't pay enough and his milk truck -- his truck was selling candies and ice cream, who knows what else, but his truck would say looky, looky, here comes cookie. [laughter] and but cookie is in new orleans, he's trying to get a cab. and he hails a cab, a cab stops and the cab driver rolls up the window and says sorry, sir, probably didn't say sir. just wanted to get to the bar down the street. what ended up happening african-american players couldn't stay in the same hotel as their white teammates and they decided to stand up and say this is not right. move the game. his father was president of the naacp at the time. tried to work out a solution. all of the white players agreed with the black players
to take over black cities in louisiana doing the same thing in michigan. we will not have the kind of turnout we've had in previous years unless we take your -- make sure we add emergency managers and the suppressions. to the list of voter suppression. >> i would like to -- >> jo ann watson. >> yes, sir? >> counselwoman from detroit. give her a round of applause. we have to challenge the constitutionality of the emergency manager law, which suspends every elected official from voting. as he said himself, he's a benevolent dictator. [inaudible] right. we need to organize at the national level, because what is happening in michigan can happen -- >> emergency management. [inaudible] >> department of justice, i think, moving with us but they haven't acted on it yet. sorry to say. >> congressman john? >> we have similar things taking place in georgia in the dekalb county. the school board has been removed by the governor. he's replaced them with his own pick. and these kinds of moves have been sanctioned by the voters. so when they put constitutional amendments on the ballot, and they t
. >> thank you for this opportunity. my name is thomas and i'm from baton rouge, louisiana. you know, and i'm sitting here and i'm taking in a lot of the discussion. of course, i'm not necessarily as young as i look, but i've been around the pool of law. in fact, for a number of years we dealt with civil rights litigation in the state of louisiana, and as i sit here and look at the audience, and we're talking about what can we do today, the first thing we need to do is get young people here. you know, most of us who are sitting in this room are old enough to recognize what transpired. and we talk about social media and how do we get young people involved. we can't do anything, congressman lewis, if we don't have young people here at the table. let me tell you why. those of you who are not familiar to many of the laws that we have put in place today have actually boxed us in, as a community. you see right now, if you notice the election of congressman throughout the country, it happened because we created this multimember districts. a lot of which we can't change today, because we don't have
energy. >> guest: louisiana i had a great trip there in a bipartisan delegation. there is such potential to open up and create jobs. when i talk about revenue generation. it's actually taking the amazing resources of natural gas and oil and also wind and the renewables and leveraging that inputting americans to work in changing lives and creating a revenue that we need for better roads and better schools. i think in washington we too often polarized either you are for the environment or for jobs or something like this and i just don't see it that way. we can do what has been done in the leasing and other areas, diversify the economy and great paying jobs. >> host: what specifically though are you talking about? >> guest: i ran on this opening up coast of virginia so we can drill and get to the natural resources that are there in an environmentally safe way. the governor ran on it and the general assembly wants it and the president the only thing holding us us back as chile demonstration. that is not a partisan comment but to the secretary of the interior they are not moving forward and e
in louisiana. hello, thanks for waiting. caller: thank you for having me. that in to comment australia, you have to vote. enrolledutomatically on you are allowed to vote all types of networks. >> what happens if you don't vote? fine or a prison sentence. you vote. it's part of your duty. >> you think something like that would work here? caller: we have too many crazies. it would not work here. it should. it's a good thing. the future of the democrats could be most anyone. i say hillary would be good. look. listening to all that i've heard ,efore, most of the republicans they are crazy. they are not the future. i certainly hope not. i'm not young. scared of what is happening to our country. the lies, the inability to help the poor, everything for the wealthy. with thet of growth very rich and the poor getting poorer all the time. >> new mexico, margaret on the republican line. taking ournk you for calls. i am here with my husband david. first of all, i want you to know that up until about three weeks ago, we were democrats and we just switch to the republican party. as catholics, we just cou
on where you were. louisiana sugarcane back on its feet, until the hurricane of 1883. you go into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing peo
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